All of Gaul is separated into three parts…

He read the first line of Gaius Julius Caesar’s Commentary on The Gallic Wars. The book, passed down to him by his mother, an avid Latin speaker and professor specializing in ancient Roman history, was cherished by the boy.

It is not only an account of Caesar’s Gallic wars, but a story of blood, conquest, and heroism. What happened antebellum? The boy asked his mother. She replied by telling the boy a story of Caesar’s mentorship under the ambitious Pompey Magnus.

He used to dream in Latin. Dreams of fighting by the side of Marc Antony and Julius Caesar. The boy was a real Roman legionnaire. He adorned the famous Roman armor — the Lorica Segmentata and underneath he wore a crimson tunic. He became an expert in all military formations and tactics: testudo!

The boy’s skin was like charred bronze and weathered leather. His hair like white wool. No longer dreaming of ancient Roman wars, the boy sits in perpetuity. He stares out the window; his mother a distant memory. A stranger living in the same domicile clutches Caesar’s Commentarii De Bello Gallico.

The boy, full of youth again is back on the battlefield. Facing an imminent horde of barbarians, he steadies his hand and prepares to plunge a gladius into the belly of the beast.

All of Gaul is separated into three parts…
Gallia est omnis divisa in partes tres…

Product of the projects. Local socio-political urban philosophy.